Driving Experience

Is the Tesla P985 D Worth the Extra Cash?

The Need for Speed

Ever since the announcement of the P85D last year, I have been bombarded with questions? Is it really that much faster? Will the autopilot work? Is it worth the extra money?

In December I had a chance to ride (not drive) in a P85D at a special event held in the Tesla Highland Park Service Center. It was a very nice event. Hors d’oeuvres wine and craft beer was available as well as four P85 D’s constantly going for test rides.

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I really love the Highland Park facility. They continually make updates to the building inside and out and the people who work there are super nice. I’ve gotten to know them pretty well over the last 19 months as I stop in for events or to simply chat. But back to the topic.

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I got into the front passenger seat and Dave, my driver, pointed to the settings on the screen and asked, “Do you want sport acceleration or insane?” Really? You’re asking me that question? Okay, how about insane.

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Dave smiled. It was one of those smiles you get when you’ve asked for something without knowing what you’ve asked for and the result will not be what you imagine, at all. He navigated to the on ramp, slowed to a stop and then pressed the accelerator all the way to the floor.

Insane is a very good description. I wouldn’t call it acceleration. It’s more like escape velocity. You are pressed back against the seat and your stomach rises up into your throat. Telephone poles go by like they were part of a picket fence. It is truly a feeling of an “other world” car. My first reaction was wow, my second was, I could really get into trouble with this car.

A Short Test Drive in a P85D. Yes it does bring a tear to your eye.

Of course one can almost never use this type of power because we drive on roads where mere mortal cars roam and of course those pesky rules of the road. If having it for bragging rights is what you’re after, then you will always win that bar bet.

The autopilot sensors were working, reading and displaying the speed limit signs on the center console; as if that mattered. The firmware for autopilot was not yet ready for production, so no deal on seeing how that worked.

One of the most attractive things about the D announcement for me was the 4 wheel drive feature. I’m doing fine in the snow here, but all wheel drive would be a much more useful add on for me and many others as well I’m guessing. When Tesla announce the D they updated their Design Studio section on their site and offered the 60kWh battery with a 4 wheel drive option for $4,000 more. If that was available when I ordered my in early 2013, I would have jumped at it. Soon after they pulled that option for the 60kWh and now offer it only on the 85kWh and PkWh models.

One other downside about the 4 wheel drive option is that it virtually eliminates the Frunk as a storage compartment. The new motor and all the technology and mechanics required to deliver it means you can probably put your brief case or backpack in the Frunk and that’s about all. I assume that will also be the deal when the Model X comes out with all wheel drive. No one will be popping out of the Frunk on any demonstrations on cars with this options.

For me, I can’t justify the extra money for a D. Tesla rates the D with a 253 mile battery range and the 85 at 270 miles. Early reports indicated that the D would be able to make adjustments in how the battery powers the car, and actually deliver more miles. This doesn’t seem to be the supported very strongly based on how Tesla specs out the cars. I would rather have more range with 4 wheel drive as a close second.

It’s so hard to answer a question like “Is it worth it?” It’s always a personal choice. If it’s important to have speed and acceleration and you have the means, then go for it. It also might just might put some 85kWh and P85’s on the used market sooner, allowing new buyers to enjoy the experience.

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Cold Weather Driving in my Model S: Year 2

My Tesla Model S Laughs in the Face of Winter

This is the second winter driving in my Model S. The last Chicago winter was the worst one in 40 years. I posted my experience last year about this time. Now for the follow-up.

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November was unseasonably cold, but December was actually quite nice. A number of 40 and 50 degree temps right up until the end of the year. We’re now in early January and the cold has hit us squarely between the eyes. Single digit temps during the day and sub-zero at night for the last week. Snow has not been much of an issue, but I’m sure it’s coming.

So, how does it feel moving into winter number two? Am I dissuaded from owning my Model S? Fine questions indeed.

Clearly one must adapt driving habits in the winter, but that’s true of any car. You don’t let your gas tank get too low in cold weather, so likewise, in a Model S, you watch the battery range much closer and take steps to reduce risk.

My Kw/ml average exceed 820 this week. That’s well above the 300 I get during the other 9 months of the year and a little higher than I saw in last year’s Vortex weather. Since my daily commute is short this additional energy usage doesn’t impact me in the least.

With my iPhone app I can start the heater of my car and warm up the cabin to a toasty 70° before I arrive at my car which I park in an open concrete parking structure. No issues with the door handle operation, any of the software processing or electronics.

As far as driving snow, I continue to disable the regenerative braking feature which helps when the roads have yet to be plowed or I’m in a public parking lot. As with any car the best advice is slow down and be vigilant.

Drive on.